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What We Do/White-nose Syndrome

Affected Species


Currently, ten hibernating species have been affected by White-nose Syndrome or documented with the WNS-fungus.

big brown bat
eastern small-footed myotis
little brown myotis

big brown bat
Eptesicus fuscus

eastern small-footed myotis
Myotis leibii

little brown myotis
Myotis lucifugus

northern myotis
indiana myotis
tri-colored bat

northern long-eared myotis
Myotis septentrionalis

Indiana myotis
Myotis sodalis
(federally endangered)

tri-colored bat
Perimyotis subflavus

northern myotis
Silver-haired bat
southeastern myotis

gray myotis
Myotis grisescens
(federally endangered)

Silver-haired bat
Lasionycteris noctivagans

southeastern myotis
Myotis austroriparius

Virginia big-eared bat
 

Virginia big-eared bat
Corynorhinus townsendii virginianus
(federally endangered)

 

White-nose Syndrome has now reached significant hibernation sites of the gray myotis, another federally endangered species, and Virginia big-eared bats, an endangered subspecies. Endangered Gray bats have been confirmed with the disease, but no fatalities have been reported yet. Virginia big-eared bats have been confirmed with the fungus, but the disease so far hasn't manifested in this subspecies of Townsend's big-eared bats.  According to the USGS, 25 of the 47 U.S. bat species hibernate in caves and mines and thus could be affected by White-nose Syndrome in the future.

Photos © Merlin D. Tuttle, BCI

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Last Updated: Thursday, 08 May 2014
Unless otherwise noted, all images are copyright ©Merlin D. Tuttle and/or ©Bat Conservation International