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Home / Media & Info / BATS Archives / 1999 Bat Conservation and Management Workshops
BATS Magazine

VOLUME 16, NO. 3 Fall 1998


1999 Bat Conservation and Management Workshops

Join us next year for one of BCI's field study workshops and gain hands-on experience in bat conservation and research techniques including mist netting, harp trapping, radiotracking, night-vision observation, and habitat assessment. The $995 cost of the workshop includes all tuition, lodging, fees, and transportation from the local departure city. A limited number of full and partial scholarships are available for federal and state agency biologists, land managers, and others with special needs. For complete itineraries, application forms, and additional information about these events, contact:

Janet Tyburec
BCI
P.O. Box 86493
Tucson, Arizona 85754
jtyburec@batcon.org

or get the latest information on the BCI web site at http://www. batcon.org/ toptrips.html

Arizona
In Arizona we emphasize western bats with a special focus on species identification. Here we can expect to catch and release at least 16 different species in a single evening with additional close-up observations of endangered long-nosed and Mexican long-tongued bats at hummingbird feeders. Our workshop accommodations at the renowned American Museum of Natural History Southwestern Research Station bring us face to face with some of the most diverse habitats in North America. We will capitalize on this diversity by exploring how bats utilize this area for their various roosting, foraging, maternity, and migrational needs.
Limited to 12 people per session.
Three 5-day sessions beginning
May 29, June 3, or June 8, 1999

Pennsylvania
In central Pennsylvania we emphasize eastern bats and habitats with activities designed to teach participants how to make a personal difference for bat conservation. Here we will learn about bat houses and other artificial roosts and how these man-made structures are having an impact on remaining bat populations. Activities include an early morning field trip to an old churchyard, where the dawn return of over 16,000 little brown bats will fill the sky above us, and a daytime trip down into a protected limestone mine, where six species of bats, including the federally endangered Indiana myotis, hibernate during the winter months.
Limited to 15 people per session.
Two 5-day sessions beginning August 10 or August 17, 1999 (tentative dates)

Kentucky
At Mammoth Cave National Park, Kentucky, we emphasize the unique habitat needs and conservation initiatives for cave-dwelling bats, including the federally endangered gray and Indiana myotis. Regional U.S. Forest Service, Fish and Wildlife Service, and National Park Service biologists join BCI staff in providing instruction and guidance during the workshop. We will join these professionals to enter protected caves, learn about the complex underground habitats available for bats, and identify areas of present and historic bat use.
Limited to 20 people.
One 5-day session beginning September 7, 1999 (tentative date)

NEW! Pacific Northwest
In this new workshop, we will emphasize the importance of forest habitats to bats. The Pacific Northwest contains some of North America's most diverse wooded habitat and up to 16 species of bats. We will compare different types of woodland habitat and discuss management and mitigation efforts with local experts. We will also visit the rugged landscape of Lava Beds National Monument, home to Townsend's big-eared bats and Mexican free-tailed bats. Biologists from the U.S. Forest Service will assist with instruction and demonstrations and brief us on newly developed bat survey protocols for the region.
Limited to 25 people.
One 5-day session beginning
July 27, 1999 (tentative date)

[photo h]
Dr. Lance Risley of William Paterson University in New Jersey, catches bats in a small harp trap in front of a gated mine at a BCI workshop. After attending the course, Risley's research on forest canopies shifted to include forest-dwelling bats and the impact of urbanization on their roosting and feeding habits.

Join us next year for one of BCI's field study workshops and gain hands-on experience in bat conservation and research techniques including mist netting, harp trapping, radiotracking, night-vision observation, and habitat assessment. The $995 cost of the workshop includes all tuition, lodging, fees, and transportation from the local departure city. A limited number of full and partial scholarships are available for federal and state agency biologists, land managers, and others with special needs. For complete itineraries, application forms, and additional information about these events, contact:

Janet Tyburec
BCI
P.O. Box 86493
Tucson, Arizona 85754
jtyburec@batcon.org

or get the latest information on the BCI web site at http://www. batcon.org/ toptrips.html

Arizona
In Arizona we emphasize western bats with a special focus on species identification. Here we can expect to catch and release at least 16 different species in a single evening with additional close-up observations of endangered long-nosed and Mexican long-tongued bats at hummingbird feeders. Our workshop accommodations at the renowned American Museum of Natural History Southwestern Research Station bring us face to face with some of the most diverse habitats in North America. We will capitalize on this diversity by exploring how bats utilize this area for their various roosting, foraging, maternity, and migrational needs.
Limited to 12 people per session.
Three 5-day sessions beginning
May 29, June 3, or June 8, 1999

Pennsylvania
In central Pennsylvania we emphasize eastern bats and habitats with activities designed to teach participants how to make a personal difference for bat conservation. Here we will learn about bat houses and other artificial roosts and how these man-made structures are having an impact on remaining bat populations. Activities include an early morning field trip to an old churchyard, where the dawn return of over 16,000 little brown bats will fill the sky above us, and a daytime trip down into a protected limestone mine, where six species of bats, including the federally endangered Indiana myotis, hibernate during the winter months.
Limited to 15 people per session.
Two 5-day sessions beginning August 10 or August 17, 1999 (tentative dates)

Kentucky
At Mammoth Cave National Park, Kentucky, we emphasize the unique habitat needs and conservation initiatives for cave-dwelling bats, including the federally endangered gray and Indiana myotis. Regional U.S. Forest Service, Fish and Wildlife Service, and National Park Service biologists join BCI staff in providing instruction and guidance during the workshop. We will join these professionals to enter protected caves, learn about the complex underground habitats available for bats, and identify areas of present and historic bat use.
Limited to 20 people.
One 5-day session beginning September 7, 1999 (tentative date)

NEW! Pacific Northwest
In this new workshop, we will emphasize the importance of forest habitats to bats. The Pacific Northwest contains some of North America's most diverse wooded habitat and up to 16 species of bats. We will compare different types of woodland habitat and discuss management and mitigation efforts with local experts. We will also visit the rugged landscape of Lava Beds National Monument, home to Townsend's big-eared bats and Mexican free-tailed bats. Biologists from the U.S. Forest Service will assist with instruction and demonstrations and brief us on newly developed bat survey protocols for the region.
Limited to 25 people.
One 5-day session beginning
July 27, 1999 (tentative date)



Dr. Lance Risley of William Paterson University in New Jersey, catches bats in a small harp trap in front of a gated mine at a BCI workshop. After attending the course, Risley's research on forest canopies shifted to include forest-dwelling bats and the impact of urbanization on their roosting and feeding habits.
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All articles in this issue:
On the Cover
Bat Workshops: Putting Conservation Into Practice
Workshops Scholarships: An Investment with Exponential Returns
1999 Bat Conservation and Management Workshops
Memoirs from Bat Camp
Growing Needs, Expanded Training
Hidden Housing - Artificial Bark for Bats
BCI Highlights
Legal Protection Gained for Bats in Sarawak, Malaysia
Wish List
Thirteen Countries Celebrate European Bat Night
Vacationer's Guide to Bat Watching
1999 Student Scholarships Applications Available
Experience the World's Most Amazing Bats with Merlin Tuttle on BCI Founder's Circle Tours

Unless otherwise noted, all images are copyright ©Merlin D. Tuttle and/or ©Bat Conservation International