English Filipino French German Italian Portuguese Spanish About this Translator
Home / Media & Info / BATS Archives / On the Cover
BATS Magazine

VOLUME 16, NO. 2 Summer 1998


On the Cover

cov16n2.jpg

The Jamaican fruit-eating bat (Artibeus jamaicensis) eats figs and many other tropical forest fruits, including the pulpy layer surrounding nuts, such as the wild almond pictured. After carrying fruits away to eat them, the bat then drops the nuts, dispersing seeds for future trees. In addition to fruit, this species also eats pollen, nectar, and a few insects.

Jamaican fruit-eating bats range from central Mexico to Paraguay and Brazil, and also live in the Bahamas, the Antilles, Trinidad, Tobago, and probably Key West, Florida. They can be found in a variety of habitats, from dry deciduous forest to tropical evergreen forest and even cloud forest. Caves and hollow trees are their most common roosts, but sometimes they also create roosts by biting the midribs of large leaves until they hang down to form tents.

Photo by Merlin D. Tuttle

Top of page View as PDF
 
All articles in this issue:
On the Cover
Estimating the Economic Value of Insect-Eating Bats: A Case Study From Cambodia
On The Job- Bat Conservation in Ireland
The Bats of Puerto Rico
Members In Action: Joyce Thurau
BCI Membership Online
The Mystery Chart of Spring 1998
Look for "Masters of the Night: The True Story of Bats"* at these locations:
Letters
Membership Renewal Notices via E-mail
Attention Bat Lovers!

Unless otherwise noted, all images are copyright ©Merlin D. Tuttle and/or ©Bat Conservation International