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BATS Magazine

VOLUME 12, NO. 2 Summer 1994


ON THE COVER

The relatively long black ears of the long-eared myotis (Myotis evotis) are distinctive and dramatic in contrast with its paler body fur. These are western bats, predominately found in coniferous forests, often at higher elevations. Although overall, little is known about them, studies indicate that their feeding behavior is somewhat flexible, since they have an ability to capture airborne insects as well as to glean prey from vegetation or the ground. Their main diet appears to consist of moths, and the type of echolocation they use when hunting makes them well adapted to hunting in forested habitats.

Long-eared bats were among the nine species studied last summer in Arizona's Coconino National Forest [page 4]. The project gave researchers some of their first clues into where these bats roost and give birth to their young.
Photo by Merlin D. Tuttle

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All articles in this issue:
ON THE COVER
Bat Conservation: A New Priority for Federal Agencies
ON THE TRACK OF FOREST BATS
A Volunteer's Journal
The Great Red Island: A Future for its Bats?
Guam National Wildlife Refuge Moves Forward
Visit the "Lost World" of Venezuela with Dr. Merlin Tuttle as your guide
Bat Houses: An Educational Opportunity
Participate in the North American Bat House Research Project
REVIEWS
Look for "Masters of the Night: The True Story of Bats"* at these locations
"Secret World of Bats" Seen Worldwide
VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY
Increase your conservation investment with a matching gift
WISH LIST
LETTERS
ON THE BACK

Unless otherwise noted, all images are copyright ©Merlin D. Tuttle and/or ©Bat Conservation International